I'm an independent associate producer and archive researcher working out of Brookyn, NY. I'm currently working on two music-related documentaries. The Whole Gritty City is about three middle and high school marching bands overcoming inner-city struggles in post-Katrina New Orleans. And Don't Think I've Forgotten is a doc 10 years in the making about the lost rock-n-roll of Cambodia! Check out their FB pages!



I've recently worked as an Associate Producer on the new feature length documentary about the 1970s Memphis band, Big Star entitled "Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me." I worked for six years at Getty Images, researching and licensing photos, footage and music. 

I've also had the pleasure of acting as an Assistant Programmer for the fourth annual Chicago International Movies and Music Festival, CIMM Fest. I contributed filmmaker interviews to the website leading up to the fest, April 12th - 15th, 2012. http://www.cimmfest.org/



I have contributed reportage and film criticism to Facets Features, the blog arm of Facets Multimedia and I’ve presented and lectured on counter-culture and horror films of bygone eras there through Facets Night School. 

In 2011 I was very happy to join the Chicago Underground Film Festival family overseeing all aspects of Hospitality. CUFF is an annual event showcasing independent, experimental and documentary films from around the world and is the longest running underground film festival in the country! 



I've completed an internship at the long-standing cinema arts non-proftit Chicago Filmmakers where I programmed two short film showcases and where I learned a great deal about what it takes to run a non-profit theater and filmmakers' collective. Chicago Filmmakers is a great resource for filmmakers from all genres and in all stages of their careers. Check 'em out! 



I enjoy producing and editing short documentaries and volunteering my time to non-profits doing cool stuff.

Please email me for work opportunities or creative ventures at: amyjboyd@gmail.com.


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Emerging Filmmakers

Andrea Sisson and Pete Ohs

By Amy J. Boyd

Filmmaking Duo Combining and Confounding Art and Film

Filmmakers Andrea Sisson and Pete Ohs premiered their debut feature “I Send You This Place” at the venerable Full Frame Documentary film Festival in Durham, NC last year. They followed up that screening with a New York City premiere at the Video Art and Experimental Film Festival this past February. The film is hard to pigeon hole, but the directors themselves couldn’t be more accessible. They’re creating art that is moving, playful and just the right amount of challenging.

Sisson and Ohs are a married couple working under the moniker Lauren Edward, a combination of their middle names. Sission is trained in fashion and design and spent time in New York City before relocating back to the Midwest and meeting her husband. Ohs grew up in Ohio and has been making films since grade school. She may choose to communicate a thought, or work through a solution, by designing a suit, while he might gravitate towards creating a film to express an idea. Together they create all aspects of their films themselves; costumes, music, editing, camera, writing.

Similarly, they’ve combined their talents to work in a unique interdisciplinary style based on their backgrounds and interests. Stretching the definition of traditional film, they incorporate a mix of different formal elements including graphics, rhythms, color and sound to tell their stories. Plot becomes almost the least important point.

For its annual Cincinnati event, the pair was asked to create a promo video for OFFF, the Online Flash Film Festival and conference which celebrates online videos that use new technology. They produced a sponsor video that incorporated sponsor logos, everyday props and mod fashions into a clever tableau reminiscent of Jacques Tati. Sisson: “We always come back to him in a way.”

It’s that inquisitive spirit and open collaboration that has led to their first feature being played at two very different festivals. They’ve found a perfect balance between experimental and traditional. But their main goal for filmmaking is to give audience members an experience.

“I Send You This Place” credits the two as designers rather than directors, blurring the lines between art and film. “Sometimes we asked ourselves, ‘Is this even a film?’ Ohs recalls. “I don’t know if it is… but it is certainly art.”

The pair knew they wanted to create a film during a ten month fellowship trip spent isolated in Iceland, but they soon found that they couldn’t be restrained by a preconceived narrative. They opened up their minds to what the project could be and Sisson grants that “…in that way it was very much an experiment.”  

It then turned out, almost coincidentally, that film actually was the best medium for communicating what they were experiencing during this cerebral, intensely personal journey. Through narration, metaphor, and breathtaking visuals, they’ve succeeded in crafting a story that is thought-provoking, poignant and, at times, sanguine.

Ohs would like to think: “…for the seventy minutes of the film, perhaps it can give the audience member an experience as well.”

Their next project is a similarly intriguing feature entitled “Everything Beautiful is Far Away” which also utilizes nature as a driving element. They sequestered themselves away to shoot this one as well, but traded faraway Iceland for rural Ohio. With a tagline that might read “A man, a woman, and a robot head… in the desert,” it sounds just as hard to pin down.

While Sisson and Ohs feel that New York is home to anyone creative, the water, nature, parks, and beaches of Los Angeles are now calling them to the sunnier coast. They’re excited by the challenge of tacking the filmmaking industry in LA and, citing Onur Turkel, intend to bring the can-do spirit of New York filmmaking with them.

Keep your eye on these two as its clear, their interdisciplinary and inquisitive approach will continue to yield exciting films… and art. 

Their debut feature “I Send You This Place” opens Friday, June 7th at reRun Theater in Brooklyn.

Good morning cabal, from WLSD. Amy J. Boyd reviews the new release "Radio Unnameable" for Cinespect.

“Radio Unnameable” is showing through Tuesday, October 2 at Film Forum.

Running time: 87 minutes; Not rated.

“Radio Unnameable” skillfully explores the timelessness of community, loneliness, and freedom of expression. It is a film about a period in time, a man, and a radio program. While it intimates the inquisitive spirit of each, it substitutes a more daring and abstract approach, perhaps best reflective of the radio program itself, for a more linear telling of a nonetheless remarkable story.

Bob Fass’s New York City radio program, Radio Unnameable, hit the airwaves in 1963, when fast-talking, jingle-slinging Murray the K was king of the commercial dial. Fass and listener-supported station WBAI offered the alternative, a radio program that was an event and a quiet revolution that still makes people smile and reminisce today.

People from every class and walk of life would call in Monday through Friday, 12am to the wee hours of the morning, to voice their municipal grievances or share their favorite recipes on this open platform. One of the most beautiful moments in the film is a conversation between two callers discovering the first snow of the season.

The show gave a voice to the lonely, the outcast, and the unsung heroes of the city. It fostered an intimacy between callers, guests and listeners, not only exploring, but moving beyond differences of race, gender, and creed. Perhaps it’s not surprising then, that after four years on the air, it also became the stage from which the radical anti-war and countercultural Yippie, or Youth International Party, movement was launched.

During the 1960s, Fass’s program promoted actions to help clean up neglected neighborhoods, and sponsored happenings, like the Human Fly-in, for the simple purpose of bringing otherwise unconnected people together. Neither Fass nor his listeners could define exactly what they were doing, but they knew it was liberating and that they were learning from each other. We hear one caller musing, “I haven’t done anything like that before… it was really great” over a photo of an impossible number of kids piled on top of an old Studebaker on a grungy Lower East Side street. This photo, snapped off-the-cuff during a Sweep-In, looks like a still from a 1980s Hollywood nostalgia film. While nostalgia films often mimic the look of a period, they fail to capture the true spirit of the time. In the Studebaker photo, however, we see the idealistic spirit that came to define an entire decade. We see it in outstanding detail in the bemused and delighted expressions of the kids and volunteers.

I spoke with directors Jessica Wolfson and Paul Lovelace, who were struck by how committed and dedicated the Radio Unnameable listeners were to speaking out against national and local injustices. “It was extraordinary… and the Yippie-lore was mind blowing.” The film is a beautiful tapestry of characters, images, and music, and it undeniably warrants repeat viewing.

Although the film begins in the days of the Three Penny Opera, it has an added air of immediacy as the parallels between the Yippies and the Occupy movement become strikingly apparent. Jessica comments, “To be honest, it’s somewhat depressing that fifty years later we still haven’t conquered these atrocities.”

Bob was an innovator in the field of citizen journalism, and many people compare the style of his show to that of social media. Paul said that it was a pleasant surprise to find these timely connections upon delving into Fass’s story. “Even though social media is evolving so rapidly today, it had a more potent effect in the 1960s.” Radio Unnameable was a centralized, unique island of misfits, sending out dispatches from the middle of the FM dial.

On Bob’s show, silence is golden (the antithesis of commercial radio). While the film itself embraces the more traditional structure of an interview-heavy documentary, it’s not afraid to sit with silence either. It takes us down the empty, night-washed streets of New York City after the nine-to-fivers have all gone home. This is when we see the city’s unsung heroes, Bob’s loyal and diverse listeners, come out to silently clean up the effluvia of the day.

When Jessica and Paul sat down to structure the film, they decided that Radio Unnameable’s stream-of-consciousness, free-for-all style didn’t make a lot of sense in this medium. They decided that the best way to tell Bob Fass’s story would be chronologically, “pinpointing these amazing events in his life.” While the film provides a fresh take and a personal perspective on protest movements that you may have thought you already understood, such as the women’s liberation movement, it’s strongest when it’s using abstract footage to elicit a feeling rather than obvious footage to illustrate a point.

The use of abstract, kinetic and neon imagery captures the manic nature of a free spirit experimenting in an unspoiled environment. (Nudity for Peace!) In combining color footage with dark, moody, and grainy shots of random corners of a sleeping metropolis, the film approaches the clever irreverence that keeps Fass’s show fresh and challenging.

Caller: “It’d be great if you could sing a little bit better.”

Bob Dylan: “Well, I appreciate that.”

The atmosphere that Fass creates in the WBAI studio seems to put people at ease and forces them to drop any of their pretentions. He has such an easy way with words, a measured cadence as he tosses off incredible insights, incomplete thoughts and affable reveries. He asks Joni Mitchell how to say her name “Joni or Joan?” And she replies “Joni, J-o-n-i, with a circle instead of a dot.”

Through Gregory Wright’s brilliant, but not flashy, editing we feel as if we’re getting a glimpse into Fass’s world. He pairs grainy, handheld footage of the period with audio from a typical Radio Unnameable program. It feels as if it could be Bob walking down the sidewalk with his color 8mm camera, dodging darting kids and lumbering garbage trucks on his way to work some chilly autumn evening, the spirit of New York coming alive on screen as over the airwaves.

Similarly, John Pirozzi’s cinematography reflects Fass’s wandering meditations. He expertly racks focus in the present-day studio scenes, and meanders between flashing lights, shiny microphones, and curious tangles of cords, searching for his subject, exploring different angles.

At the opening night screening , Bob announced the unsanctioned giveaway of bags of popcorn to any people who recognize themselves in the crowd scenes. This is indicative of his charming rebelliousness and frustrating eccentricity.

We’re privy to all the amazing audio included in the film because of Fass’s meticulous preservation. He says of the film, “It is a place where these archives I’ve been carrying around with me for fifty years, the photographs that people have taken of these various events, the film, and the comments are collected. It’s fifty years in ninety minutes.”

Jessica relates, “Bob is an amazing photographer, as well. He kept everything and gave us full access to this… treasure trove.” The last movement of the film follows New York City historian Mitch Blank—whose enthusiasm is infectious—as he leads a team of volunteers, young and old, to salvage the precious bounty from a makeshift, deteriorating storage room.

The film is one-third audio, one-third archival footage and stills, and one-third original footage. Jessica notes, “If you watch enough docs you tend to see the same footage being used over and over… we didn’t want to use the same stuff.”

Instead, they engaged amateur filmmakers and photographers who were just out there, reaching out to people on blogs, message boards, and the airwaves, tapping into stuff that’s never been seen or used before. It took several years and a lot of outreach. Anthology Film Archives was a big resource and was particularly helpful in connecting the filmmakers with contributors.

Bob says, “I really like the movie. And I tell ya, I don’t think it’s just because it brings back my memories. It’s because it brings back memories of times when there was an intentional community that took some of its ideas from what came out over the radio from other members of the community. We cleaned up blocks on the Lower East Side together. We got gassed and beaten together. We had laughs and we had parties and we’re still here.”

“Radio Unnameable” has screened at many festivals outside of New York, and according to Paul and Jessica, people consistently stand up and say, “I grew up in New York and Bob Fass’s show changed my life.” The directors confess that they are amazed and overwhelmed by the enthusiastic responses to the film from both longtime fans and new converts.

The premiere last week was a sold-out show, with friends attending from near and far.  In her introductory remarks, Film Forum Director Karen Cooper called Fass a faithful companion and likened his voice to God’s, saying that you could roll over sleepless in bed and flip on the dial and he’d be there.

Bob Fass can still be heard on WBAI every Thursday night from midnight until 3am. Call and talk with him live at 212-209-2900. You can hear a Q&A with the directors and Fass on Film Forum’s podcast page here. Donate to listener supported Free Speech Radio 99.5fm WBAI, Pacifica Radio in New York City here.

Amy J. Boyd reviews the Sundance hit “Hello I Must Be Going,” opening Friday, September 7 at Angelika Film Center, for Cinespect.com.

Searching for Bottom

Amy J. Boyd reviews the Sundance hit “Hello I Must Be Going,” opening Friday, September 7 at Angelika Film Center.

Cinespect.com

Hello I Must Be Going” opens Friday, September 7 at Angelika Film Center.

Running time: 105 minutes; Rated R.

“Hello I Must Be Going” is a film that dances in the in-betweens, breathes through its imagery, and makes conventional romantic fare sing with candid realism. The film opens on a dimly lit spare room turned makeshift bedroom, blurry as from sleep. Drowsy slumbering sounds are suddenly choked awake, interrupted by the piercing clang of home improvement undertakings coming from below. A disheveled woman rises, surrenders, and drops back into her pull out sofa. And so the rest of the film follows suit, coupling opposites and deriving its nonchalant humor from the unremarkable injustices that we all must experience every day.

Refined, beautiful, quirky actress Melanie Lynskey (“Win Win,” “Up In The Air,” “Heavenly Creatures”) plays Amy, an almost hapless thirty-something new divorcee hiding out in her parents’ glass and tile expression of a dream home. She gulps red wine, gets rides in the back seat of her parents’ car and watches Marx Brothers movies cross-legged on the floor all day while her family’s main preoccupation is getting her out of the single sweaty t-shirt and ill-fitting bra she’s been living in for the past several months. The only rejected woman cliché we’re missing is the tub of ice cream. Yet Lynskey inhabits the role with easy charm, restrained exasperation, and true naturalism, turning the character into more than the sum of the script’s parts.

While screenwriter Sarah Koskoff has infused the script with snicker-worthy witticisms and clever quips from all characters (“I’m so proud of you it gives me Tourette’s”), Blythe Danner, who plays Ruth, Amy’s mother, adorned in delicate turquoise and blousy casual silks, provides some of the film’s best laughs. Ruth is as compelling a character as her daughter, a restless tension brewing beneath her mannered and measured demeanor, but the true development of her character feels a bit sacrificed for time or tone. Danner must have recognized the heart and the potential of the film right off the bat though, as she signed on with the team very early in the process and stuck with them all the way through.

Christopher Abbott (HBO’s “Girls”) plays Jeremy, Amy’s nineteen-year-old love interest. He is alternately adorable, intelligent, steamy, and emotional—testaments to what director Todd Louiso recognizes as Abbott’s lack of pretense, uncommon for male actors of his age.

Where Amy’s seemingly wearisome family represents a future she’s failed at forging, Jeremy represents a youth that she somehow betrayed along the way. Cinematographer Julie Kirkwood paints these two worlds differently while maintaining a beautiful, bright, and soft tone throughout the film.

The mismatched couple never seem more natural than when they’re together, and the camerawork reflects that vulnerability and closeness. They sneak away like true suburban lovers—to parks and beaches, dark empty dining rooms, and the backseats of parents’ cars. Here they’ve collapsed against the doors, and are talking casually and intimately across the divide, the camera picking up the weary air left over after an impassioned exploit and catching the tinges of condensation left fogging the corners of the windows behind their shoulders, stranded rain drops like stars glittering around their heads.

They lie together on his childhood bed and he asks what she really wants to do with her life. She pulls out a slide show of the art photography she fostered through college, before her marriage. She’s remembering, gathering strength, and we hear the music of Laura Veirs swelling in the background. It feels familiar and comfortable and I’m reminded in the subtlest way of the more lilting passages from 1980s and 1990s alternative rocker Tanya Donelly (Throwing Muses, The Breeders, Belly). Veirs is a beautiful singer-songwriter, punk-turned-parent, maybe three years older than Lynskey’s character Amy; both would’ve attended college, created artwork, and developed a path at the same time, in the 1990s.

Through this reference, the music paints a richer picture of Amy and lends another layer of naturalism to the film. That these songs were chosen to bolster scenes in which Amy starts to reclaim her confidence and independence, and perhaps veer onto a more finely tuned path informed by her youth, is a particularly striking touch. Writer Sarah Koskoff even likens Laura Veirs’s songs to Amy’s own voice in the film.

We follow Amy throughout the entire film, as she floats between different worlds, none quite her own, searching for the point at which she has nowhere to go but up, finding it “easier to be what other people want you to be, than fight it.” Editor Tom McArdle cuts discerningly from the electrifying promise of a new lover directly to the obnoxiously banal entertaining of a toddler in her parents’ parlor. Amy gets swept away by the freedom of youth and burdened with the defeat of her parents, sometimes all within the same scene.

It’s the restrained reinforcing of these contrasts that gives “Hello I Must Be Going” tension, authenticity, and relevancy, and it’s the main character’s ability to embrace humor in reaching the bottom that gives it an infectious “giddy freedom.”

Enter the Reaper

Amy J. Boyd 2012

Song by Entrance

Made with Photo Booth and iMovie

Car horns, gears crunching, trucks rumbling, brakes screeching.  The aural onslaught of the daily commute seeps into our lives with entitlement.  Social water torture.  Break out of the monotony for your own survival.


Shot on Canon 514 XL-S Super8 film camera using Kodak Tri-X Reversal film as part of Mono No Aware Super8mm workshop, February 2012.


mononoawarefilm.com/index.html


By Amy J. Boyd

bigstarstory:

THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE featured Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me in today’s ‘screens’ column.  In-depth interviews with the filmmakers and insights into what Alex may have thought about the film.  Check it out!  And come say hello at SXSW next week!http://www.austinchronicle.com/screens/2012-03-09/the-ballad-of-big-star/ 

bigstarstory:

THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE featured Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me in today’s ‘screens’ column.  In-depth interviews with the filmmakers and insights into what Alex may have thought about the film.  Check it out!  And come say hello at SXSW next week!

http://www.austinchronicle.com/screens/2012-03-09/the-ballad-of-big-star/

 

bigstarstory:


Production Journal Thursday, February 2nd, 2012Yesterday the 2012 line-up was announced for the upcoming South By Southwest Music, Interactive, Film Festival…  and we’re very proud to say that Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me is on the bill!We’ll be showing a work-in-progress SNEAK PREVIEW of the film at the festival.  Check out the SXSW website for more info!http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_FS12365Also, a new supergroup will perform in tribute to power pop icons Big Star, performing the band’s 1978 album Third.http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS17219Hope to see you in March!

bigstarstory:

Production Journal Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

Yesterday the 2012 line-up was announced for the upcoming South By Southwest Music, Interactive, Film Festival…  and we’re very proud to say that Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me is on the bill!

We’ll be showing a work-in-progress SNEAK PREVIEW of the film at the festival.  Check out the SXSW website for more info!

http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_FS12365

Also, a new supergroup will perform in tribute to power pop icons Big Star, performing the band’s 1978 album Third.

http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS17219

Hope to see you in March!

bigstarstory:




Production Journal   Monday, January 16, 2012The New Year is upon us but we’ve hardly noticed here at Big Star Headquarters, or BS HQ as it’s affectionately known to those we’ve been wrangling up and chatting with lately.  In November we had the distinct honor to host internationally recognized video artist, author and musician Tav Falco right here in our Brooklyn office during a rare state-side visit.  Tav grew up in the same Memphis scene as Alex Chilton where the two became great friends and collaborators in the art damage band, Tav Falco’s Panther Burns.  We spoke with Tav about Alex’s unique voice, a mixture of Chet Baker, Mel Torme and Frank Sinatra.  We also learned about Alex’s love of baseball!  Tav is a true Southern gentleman and we’re so lucky to have his input for the Big Star story!Hot on the heels of Tav’s visit we also had the great fortune to sit down with uber-cool, renowned rock critic and author, Jaan Uhelszki.  Jaan began writing for Detroit’s legendary Creem magazine at the same time as the notorious Lester Bangs.  She got to see Big Star perform live in Memphis in 1973 at the now infamous International Rock Writers Convention, which plays an important role in our story as well.Stay tuned to the Big Star movie blog for more exciting updates and premiere information!

bigstarstory:

Production Journal   Monday, January 16, 2012

The New Year is upon us but we’ve hardly noticed here at Big Star Headquarters, or BS HQ as it’s affectionately known to those we’ve been wrangling up and chatting with lately.  In November we had the distinct honor to host internationally recognized video artist, author and musician Tav Falco right here in our Brooklyn office during a rare state-side visit.  Tav grew up in the same Memphis scene as Alex Chilton where the two became great friends and collaborators in the art damage band, Tav Falco’s Panther Burns.  We spoke with Tav about Alex’s unique voice, a mixture of Chet Baker, Mel Torme and Frank Sinatra.  We also learned about Alex’s love of baseball!  Tav is a true Southern gentleman and we’re so lucky to have his input for the Big Star story!

Hot on the heels of Tav’s visit we also had the great fortune to sit down with uber-cool, renowned rock critic and author, Jaan Uhelszki.  Jaan began writing for Detroit’s legendary Creem magazine at the same time as the notorious Lester Bangs.  She got to see Big Star perform live in Memphis in 1973 at the now infamous International Rock Writers Convention, which plays an important role in our story as well.

Stay tuned to the Big Star movie blog for more exciting updates and premiere information!

bigstarstory:

Production Journal - Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Flipping, turning, sifting and sniffing through cardboard boxes and multi-colored crates, there were all ages and all kinds of people shuffling around and weaving through the crowd at the West-side Manhattan convention hall this past weekend that hosted listener supported independent free-form radio station, WFMU’s, annual record fair.  Live music, live radio broadcasts and concert films playing on various portable viewing devices filled the air with snippets of garage band beats, man on the street interview sound bites and chords from bootlegged concerts.

And, of course, the Big Star movie team was right in the thick of it all with our camera and sound gear, searching out cool characters, rare records and stories about Big Star!

We met Keith Glass who ran the world renowned Missing Link Records in Melbourne, Australia.  The store he worked at in 1972 used to order #1 Record from their distributor every single week after the album’s original release but they never received one copy.

We also talked with dealer Scott Curean who has seven different pressings of the Third record, from both sides of the Atlantic, which he’s not willing to part with.

And then, of course, there’s the famed Brazilian pressing that’s still a mystery to dealers today!  What’s the story with that?

Are you a Big Star, Alex Chilton or Chris Bell super fan?  Do you have ticket stubs, footage or other holy relics relating to Big Star?  If so, we want to hear from you too! Please leave us a Facebook message or email us at: info@bigstarstory.com.

bigstarstory:

Production Journal - Friday, October 21
 
One reason that Big Star’s story has endured and inspired fans since the band’s inception in the early 1970’s is the abundance of reviews and articles that rock writers have continued to produce the world over.  Big Star resonated with the critics who were disenchanted with overblown and megalomaniacal early 1970s rock stars.  They felt the soul had gone out of rock-n-roll and Big Star was the band with heart who could bring it back to it’s roots.
 
An important writer on and from this period is Lenny Kaye, New York legend and rock critic for such publications as Fusion, Crawdaddy, Melody Maker, Creem and Rolling Stone.  He is also well known as a long-time guitarist and collaborator with Patti Smith, has produced for many other artists and has been nominated for three Grammy awards in the liner notes category.
 
And last week we got to pick his brain!  Lenny joined 140 other writers for the world’s first and only Rock Writers Convention held in Memphis, Tennessee in 1973.  The premise of the event was to organize and elevate a rag tag bunch of rock scribes from home and abroad, but it ended up being three-day booze fest!  The convention was sponsored by Big Star’s studio and label, Ardent Records, and the band played one of their best, most energetic live shows ever during the event.  The performance buoyed the group and brought Big Star together as a cohesive trio, ready to finish up their second album, Radio City.
 
Lenny had some great insights into the nature of the music industry and what makes a cult band.  But, of course, you’ll have to see the movie to hear the whole story!  Stay tuned to our blog and Facebook page for more rock writers’ profiles and sneak peeks into the production of the film, the Big Star Story.

bigstarstory:

Production Journal - Friday, October 21

 

One reason that Big Star’s story has endured and inspired fans since the band’s inception in the early 1970’s is the abundance of reviews and articles that rock writers have continued to produce the world over.  Big Star resonated with the critics who were disenchanted with overblown and megalomaniacal early 1970s rock stars.  They felt the soul had gone out of rock-n-roll and Big Star was the band with heart who could bring it back to it’s roots.

 

An important writer on and from this period is Lenny Kaye, New York legend and rock critic for such publications as FusionCrawdaddy, Melody Maker, Creem and Rolling Stone.  He is also well known as a long-time guitarist and collaborator with Patti Smith, has produced for many other artists and has been nominated for three Grammy awards in the liner notes category.

 

And last week we got to pick his brain!  Lenny joined 140 other writers for the world’s first and only Rock Writers Convention held in Memphis, Tennessee in 1973.  The premise of the event was to organize and elevate a rag tag bunch of rock scribes from home and abroad, but it ended up being three-day booze fest!  The convention was sponsored by Big Star’s studio and label, Ardent Records, and the band played one of their best, most energetic live shows ever during the event.  The performance buoyed the group and brought Big Star together as a cohesive trio, ready to finish up their second album, Radio City.

 

Lenny had some great insights into the nature of the music industry and what makes a cult band.  But, of course, you’ll have to see the movie to hear the whole story!  Stay tuned to our blog and Facebook page for more rock writers’ profiles and sneak peeks into the production of the film, the Big Star Story.

bigstarstory:

Big Star Story - Production Journal - Thursday, October 13th
We’re two weeks into autumn and full speed ahead into editing.  Based out of Brooklyn, New York, The Big Star Story team has set up some sweet digs with some sweet Steve Keene artwork on the walls where we’re going to be holed up until January.  We’re keeping our noses to the grindstone, but managing to squeeze in some super exciting interviews.
Last week we had a great time talking with the contagiously enthusiastic former rock critic, Nix on Pix fanzine creator and three time International Rhino Music Trivia Champion, Pete Tomlinson!  We talked about Big Star, the one and only Rock Writers Convention and of course, rock-n-roll!
Up next, the legendary Lenny Kaye!  We’ve got exciting news on the horizon and will announce it here first.  So tell all your friends and keep checking back for periodic updates as we gear up for festival season 2012!

bigstarstory:

Big Star Story - Production Journal - Thursday, October 13th

We’re two weeks into autumn and full speed ahead into editing.  Based out of Brooklyn, New York, The Big Star Story team has set up some sweet digs with some sweet Steve Keene artwork on the walls where we’re going to be holed up until January.  We’re keeping our noses to the grindstone, but managing to squeeze in some super exciting interviews.

Last week we had a great time talking with the contagiously enthusiastic former rock critic, Nix on Pix fanzine creator and three time International Rhino Music Trivia Champion, Pete Tomlinson!  We talked about Big Star, the one and only Rock Writers Convention and of course, rock-n-roll!

Up next, the legendary Lenny Kaye!  We’ve got exciting news on the horizon and will announce it here first.  So tell all your friends and keep checking back for periodic updates as we gear up for festival season 2012!

My upcoming documentary film about Facets Multi-Media in Chicago.  In production now!

My upcoming documentary film about Facets Multi-Media in Chicago.  In production now!

Chicago Underground Film Festival staff, June 2011.L-R: Amy J. Boyd; Lori Felker; Adam Strohm; Christy LeMaster; Emily Oscarson; Bryan Wendorf 

Chicago Underground Film Festival staff, June 2011.

L-R: Amy J. Boyd; Lori Felker; Adam Strohm; Christy LeMaster; Emily Oscarson; Bryan Wendorf 

Documentary Short produced for the International Documentary Challenge 2011

Butcher and Larder 

07:38 minutes

One day spent watching Chicago’s first locally sourced, sustainable butcher working against the grain to deliver humanely raised, delicious meat to homes and plates across Chicago.

Produced, Edited and Filmed By:

Amy J. Boyd
Ben Chandler
Fred Marsh
Daniel Mullen

AMY’S TOP TEN FILMS OF 20101. For Colored Girls
2. The Missing Person
3. Prodigal Sons
4. The Square
5. Jack Goes Boating
6. 12th and Delaware
7. Black Swan
8. White Material
9. Beeswax
10. Happy Tears

AMY’S TOP TEN FILMS OF 2010

1. For Colored Girls

2. The Missing Person

3. Prodigal Sons

4. The Square

5. Jack Goes Boating

6. 12th and Delaware

7. Black Swan

8. White Material

9. Beeswax

10. Happy Tears